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Wildland fires are an integral part of many ecosystems across North America; and these ecosystems often exhibit adaptations to periodic fire. These fire-adapted ecosystems are often termed fire-dependent, if recurring disturbances by fire are essential...

Person: Bryan, Mutch
Year: 1997
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

The public outcry about the 1988 fires in Yellowstone National Park and adjacent natural forests, coupled with concern among natural resource managers, convinced the Secretaries of the Departments of Interior and Agriculture to establish the Fire...

Person: Wakimoto
Year: 1990
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Mutch
Year: 1990
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

A First Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM) was developed to predict the direct consequences of prescribed fire and wildfire. FOFEM computes duff and woody fuel consumption, smoke production, and fire-caused tree mortality for most forest and rangeland...

Person: Reinhardt, Keane, Brown
Year: 1997
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The Fire Behavior Research Work Unit (RWU) of the Intermountain Research Station has been developing the Wildland Fire Assessment System (WFAS) since 1994. The WFAS will eventually combine the functionality of the current fire-danger rating system (...

Person: Burgan, Andrews, Bradshaw, Chase, Hartford, Latham
Year: 1997
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The mixture of particles, liquids, and gaseous compounds found in smoke from wildland fires is very complex. The potential for long-term adverse health effects is much greater because of this complex mixture. The particles are known to contain many...

Person: Sharkey, Ward
Year: 1997
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES