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The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is the main driver of climate variability at mid to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere, affecting wildfire activity, which in turn pollutes the air and contributes to human health problems and mortality, and...

Person: Holz, Paritsis, Mundo, Veblen, Kitzberger, Williamson, Aráoz, Bustos-Schindler, Gonzalez, Grau, Quezada
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

A wildfire with many ignition points took place in the Daxing'an Mountains of north-east China in June 2010. After the fire, moss polsters and particle traps were collected from burnt and unburnt areas a few kilometres away from four ignition...

Person: Li, Xu, Zhao
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

A larger amount of carbon is stored in forest ecosystems than in the entire atmosphere. Thus, relatively small changes in forest carbon stocks can significantly impact net carbon exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere. Changes in forest stocks...

Person: Zhang, Qin, Yuan, Jia
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these...

Person: Yue, Ciais, Zhu, Wang, Peng, Piao
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

This study monthly combustion tests were conducted on pine green leaves during June 2008 similar to May 2012 (4 years) for combustion pattern analysis of forest fires according to climate change in Korea. As result of research, fuel humidity of 75...

Person: Park, Lee, Lee, Baek, Ohga
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Tropical peatland fires play a significant role in the context of global warming through emissions of substantial amounts of greenhouse gases. However, the state of knowledge on carbon loss from these fires is still poorly developed with few studies...

Person: Konecny, Ballhorn, Navratil, Jubanski, Page, Tansey, Hooijer, Vernimmen, Siegert
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it...

Person: Balch, Nagy, Archibald, Bowman, Moritz, Roos, Scott, Williamson
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Climate projections show Australia becoming significantly warmer during the 21st century, and precipitation decreasing over much of the continent. Such changes are conventionally considered to increase wildfire risk. Nevertheless, we show that burnt...

Person: Kelley, Harrison
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires,...

Person: Ciccioli, Centritto, Loreto
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

[1] Wildfire is a common occurrence in ecosystems of northern high latitudes, and changes in the fire regime of this region have consequences for carbon feedbacks to the climate system. To improve our understanding of how wildfire influences carbon...

Person: Balshi, McGuire, Zhuang, Melillo, Kicklighter, Kasischke, Wirth, Flannigan, Harden, Clein, Burnside, McAllister, Kurz, Apps, Shvidenko
Year: 2007
Type: Document
Source: TTRS