Document


Title

Effects of wood-boring insects and bark beetles on survival and growth of burned white spruce
Document Type: Report
Author(s): Richard A. Werner ; Karen E. Post
Editor(s): Glenn P. Juday ; C. Theodore Dyrness
Publication Year: 1985

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • bark beetles
  • blue stain fungus
  • Bonanza Creek LTER
  • Buprestidae
  • Dendroctonus spp.
  • fire
  • fungus
  • growth
  • insects
  • interior Alaska
  • Ips spp.
  • Picea glauca
  • Rosie Creek
  • survival
  • Tanana Valley
  • white spruce
  • wood-borers
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: January 20, 2016
FRAMES Record Number: 6322

Description

Tree mortality in partially burned areas of the fire perimeter was primarily due to woodborer and bark beetle attacks. In addition, adjacent unburned, healthy trees can be invaded within 1 to 2 years by root-inhabiting fungi that were transmitted by root grafts from infected to healthy trees in the partially burned perimeter area. These live trees in the unburned areas are subsequently weakened by the root fungi and are predisposed to attack by bark beetles.

Citation:
Werner, Richard A.; Post, Karen E. 1985. Effects of wood-boring insects and bark beetles on survival and growth of burned white spruce. Early results of the Rosie Creek Fire Research Project 1984. Miscellaneous publication. 85-2. Fairbanks, AK: University of Alaska, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station. pp. 14-16.