Document


Title

Study of the Alaska tundra with refrence to its reactions to reindeer and other grazing
Document Type: Report
Author(s): Lawrence J. Palmer ; Charles H. Rouse
Publication Year: 1945

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • caribou
  • fire
  • grazing
  • lichen
  • reindeer
  • succession
  • tundra
  • wildlife
Topic(s):
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: December 3, 2015
FRAMES Record Number: 6096

Description

The Alaska tundra varies in width from a few miles to 200 miles along the Bering Sea and from 100 to 150 miles along the Arctic coast. Plant composition is largely lichens, grasses, sedges, alpines, and shrubs, of which 16 distinct vegetative types are described in this report. Studies were initiated in 1920 to work out the principal range and range requirements of the reindeer. Subsequent disturbance by grazing and fire, accompanied by climatic changes, has resulted in general confusion in plant mixture and occupation. Recovery of lichen range, injured by grazing or fire, may require from 20 to 40 years for restoration to original density and height. Reestablishment of vascular plants is rapid. Moderate grazing by open herding and rotational use will permit sustained utilization of undamaged tundra.

Citation:
Palmer, Lawrence J.; Rouse, Charles H. 1945. Study of the Alaska tundra with refrence to its reactions to reindeer and other grazing. Research Report 10. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. 48 p.