Document


Title

Fireline reclamation on two fire sites in interior Alaska
Document Type: Report
Author(s): Larry Knapman
Publication Year: 1982

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Alnus
  • artificial regeneration
  • Betula
  • boreal forests
  • dozers
  • erosion
  • erosion control
  • fertilizers
  • fire case histories
  • fire intensity
  • fire management
  • fire suppression
  • firebreak
  • fireline
  • forestation
  • ground cover
  • invasive species
  • native species
  • permafrost damage
  • Picea
  • pollution
  • Populus
  • regeneration
  • roots
  • runoff
  • Salix
  • sedimentation
  • soil moisture
  • soil organic matter
  • soil temperature
  • sphagnum
  • stream siltation
  • trees
  • tundra
  • wildfires
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 5935
Tall Timbers Record Number: 9211
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File DDW
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

In Interior Alaska, firelines are often constructed to help control and contain wildfires. In the early 1960's and early 1970's, the firelines were built, as in the western states, by tractors with bulldozer blades that scraped off the organic mat, knocked down trees, and pushed all material to one side of the line. The tractors worked back and forth across the fireline until mineral soil was exposed. Usually, most of the developed soil was removed with the organic mat. Firelines often were built on the easiest route between two points where the lines could be constructed most rapidly. Slope, aspect, and soil condition on the route were considered primarily in relation to fire suppression effectiveness rather than permafrost, potential erosion, or reclamation problems and solutions.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Knapman, Larry. 1982. Fireline reclamation on two fire sites in interior Alaska. BLM-Alaska Resource Management Note 1. Anchorage, AK: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office. 23 p.