Document


Title

A model design for risk assessment of line tripping caused by wildfires
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Shuzhu Shi ; Chunjing Yao ; Shiwei Wang ; Wenjun Han
Publication Year: 2018

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • corridors
  • line tripping
  • logic regression
  • MODIS - Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer
  • power lines
  • risk assessment
Region(s):
  • International
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: August 6, 2019
FRAMES Record Number: 58391

Description

A power line is particularly vulnerable to wildfires in its vicinity, and various damage including line tripping can be caused by wildfires. Using remote sensing techniques, a novel model developed to assess the risk of line tripping caused by the wildfire occurrence in high-voltage power line corridors is presented. This model mainly contains the wildfire risk assessment for power line corridors and the estimation of the probability of line tripping when a wildfire occurs in power line corridors. For the wildfire risk assessment, high-resolution satellite data, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, meteorological data, and digital elevation model (DEM) data were employed to infer the natural factors. Human factors were also included to achieve good reliability. In the estimation of the probability of line tripping, vegetation characteristics, meteorological status, topographic conditions, and transmission line parameters were chosen as influencing factors. According to the above input variables and observed historical datasets, the risk levels for wildfire occurrence and line tripping were obtained with a logic regression approach. The experimental results demonstrate that the developed model can provide good results in predicting wildfire occurrence and line tripping for high-voltage power line corridors.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Shi, Shuzhu; Yao, Chunjing; Wang, Shiwei; Han, Wenjun. 2018. A model design for risk assessment of line tripping caused by wildfires. Sensors 18(6):1941.