Document


Title

Managing white and Lutz spruce stands in south-central Alaska for increased resistance to spruce beetle
Document Type: Report
Author(s): John S. Hard; Edward H. Holsten
Publication Year: 1985

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • boreal forest
  • Dendroctonus rufipennis
  • insect control
  • Lutz spruce
  • Picea glauca
  • south-central Alaska
  • spruce bark beetle
  • stand improvement
  • thinning
  • tree vigor
  • white spruce
Topic(s):
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: August 13, 2020
FRAMES Record Number: 5788

Description

Thinning is recommended for maintaining vigorous tree growth to minimize losses caused by spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) and windthrow in residual stands of spruce in south-central Alaska. The anatomy of conifer stems, the variation in stem diameter growth, and the variability of tree response to wounding are discussed to explain why trees become vulnerable to attack by bark beetles. A working hypothesis, that beetle-attack patterns on the lower bole of trees have evolved to take advantage of the weak defense of a stressed tree, is presented as a rationale for maintaining vigorous tree growth.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Hard, John S.; Holsten, Edward H. 1985. Managing white and Lutz spruce stands in south-central Alaska for increased resistance to spruce beetle. General Technical Report PNW-GTR-188. Portland, OR: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. pp. 1-21.