Document


Title

Buildup indexes for Interior Alaska 1956-1965
Document Type: Report
Author(s): Richard J. Barney
Publication Year: 1967

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • BUI - CFFDRS Buildup Index
  • NFDRS - National Fire Danger Rating System
  • normal curve
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: April 1, 2016
FRAMES Record Number: 5594

Description

With the adoption of the National Fire Danger Rating System in Alaska, the entire State now has a common method of rating forest fire danger for all proctection agencies. Uniformity such as this was one of the primary reasons for the development of a national system. Compared with the 'lower 48' States, use and application of fire danger rating is relatively new to Alaska. The first use of danger rating in Alaska occurred in 1956 with a modified version of the Intermountain Model-8 system. Following an evaluation study, the national system was put into the field for the 1964 season. Since the introduction of this new system , relatively little has been done to translate the various indexes into planning and action tools based on local conditions. Development of local procedures and guidelines has been curtailed because of limited weather records, insuficient data, and inadequated knowledge on how the new system is related to the Alaskan conditions. We recognize the need for basic data and a method to rate fire seasons on a comparative basis as well as to measure annual development indicating the increase of severity. Because the national system is so new, there is no historical information or field experience to rely on for developing procedures. This paper presents summarized data for selected stations and outlines and explains various methods and procedures. Information covered illustrated approached that can be used but are by no means the only way to apply the national system or analyze the resulting data.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Barney, Richard J. 1967. Buildup indexes for Interior Alaska 1956-1965. Portland, OR: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 49 p.