Document


Title

Black carbon on coarse woody debris in once- and twice-burned mixed-conifer forest
Document Type: Journal
Author(s): Aspen Ward ; C. Alina Cansler ; Andrew J. Larson
Publication Year: 2017

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • active fire regime
  • black carbon
  • Bob Marshall Wilderness
  • carbon stocks
  • carbon storage
  • charcoal
  • compound disturbance
  • CWD - coarse woody debris
  • fire frequency
  • fire intensity
  • Montana
  • reburn
  • self-limiting fire
  • surface fuels
  • wilderness fire
  • wilderness management
  • wildfires
  • wildfires
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: November 12, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 55739
Tall Timbers Record Number: 33813
TTRS Location Status: Not in file
TTRS Call Number: Available
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

One important outcome of wildfire is the production of charcoal. Charcoal is highly resistant to decomposition and its physical and chemical properties enhance soil fertility and influence nutrient cycling. We compared the amount of black C (the carbon fraction of charcoal) on coarse woody debris (CWD; ³ 7.6 cm diameter) and total CWD biomass at sites burned once in a high-severity fire with sites that burned in an initial high-severity fire and then reburned eight to ten years later. Twice-burned sites contained an average of 655 kg ha-1 of black C on CWD, significantly more (P = 0.004) than the 323 kg ha-1 present in once-burned sites. Total average CWD biomass was significantly greater in once-burned sites compared to twice-burned sites (P < 0.001). Black C accounted for 0.7 % of CWD biomass in once-burned sites and 2.9 % of CWD biomass in twice-burned sites. Short-interval reburns of patches burned in an initial high-severity fire increased the amount of black C on CWD while simultaneously reducing total CWD biomass.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Ward, A., C. A. Cansler, and A. J. Larson. 2017. Black carbon on coarse woody debris in once- and twice-burned mixed-conifer forest. Fire Ecology, v. 13, no. 2, p. 143-147. 10.4996/fireecology.130288796.