Document


Title

Social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in the 21st century and future research needs
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Amy Christianson
Publication Year: 2015

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • aboriginal
  • aboriginal fire
  • aborigines
  • Australia
  • Canada
  • culture
  • education
  • fire management
  • mitigation
  • Native Americans
  • presettlement fires
  • public information
  • research
  • wildfires
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: July 10, 2019
FRAMES Record Number: 53530
Tall Timbers Record Number: 30955
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Journals - I
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

This article reviews social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in Australia, Canada and the United States after the year 2000 and explores future research needs in the field. In these three countries, social science research exploring contemporary Indigenous wildfire management has been limited although there have been interesting findings about how Indigenous culture and knowledge influences fire management. Research with Indigenous communities may be limited not because of a lack of interest by social scientists, but rather by obstacles to doing research with Indigenous communities, such as ethical and time concerns. Research needs on Indigenous wildfire management are presented, centered on the four pillars of emergency management (preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery).

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Christianson, Amy. 2015. Social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in the 21st century and future research needs. International Journal of Wildland Fire 24(2):190-200.