Document


Title

Size and chemical characterization of individual particles resulting from biomass burning of local Southern California species
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): P. J. Silva; D. Liu; C. A. Noble; K. A. Prather
Publication Year: 1999

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • aerosols
  • air quality
  • biomass burning
  • chaparral
  • chemical compounds
  • fire management
  • K - potassium
  • particulates
  • smoke effects
  • smoke management
  • southern California
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 49703
Tall Timbers Record Number: 26140
TTRS Location Status: Not in file
TTRS Call Number: Not in File
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

The chemical composition and size of individual particles derived from combustion products of several species found in Southern California were obtained using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The major inorganic species observed in >90% of all biomass burning particles is potassium, indicated by the atomic ion, as well as clusters containing chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions in the mass spectra. By obtaining positive and negative ion mass spectra it is possible to identify distinct chemical marker combinations in particles resulting from the burning of plant species, which in turn allows for differentiation from particles produced from other combustion sources such as vehicle emissions. Using these markers, particles derived from biomass burning were identified in ambient aerosol samples. © 1999 American Chemical Society.

Citation:
Silva, P. J., D.-Y. Liu, C. A. Noble, and K. A. Prather. 1999. Size and chemical characterization of individual particles resulting from biomass burning of local Southern California species. Environmental Science & Technology, v. 33, no. 18, p. 3068-3076. 10.1021/es980544p.