Document


Title

Monitoring responses of orthopteran populations to fire management in Missouri Natural Areas: base-line data and initial analyses
Document Type: Report
Author(s): H. E. Ballard; E. S. Greelee
Publication Year: 1996

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • fire frequency
  • fire management
  • insects
  • invertebrates
  • land management
  • Missouri
  • openings
  • Orthoptera
  • population density
  • prairies
  • sampling
  • wildlife habitat management
  • wildlife management
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: July 26, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 48849
Tall Timbers Record Number: 25079
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

From the Executive Summary ... 'Concern has steadily grown in recent years over the impacts of prescribed burn management on invertebrate communities. Fire has been widely adopted for habitat restoration of many natural areas. Conversely, vocal pressure from naturalists and academic entomologists has left many stewards in limbo over fire frequency and management unit size in natural areas, and even whether to burn some sites at all. Debates over the use of fire in natural areas have assumed that different groups of invertebrates would respond similarly to frequent burn management.To evaluate the effects of prescribed burn management, baseline data were gathered in July and August of 1992 and 1993 on the frequency of Orthoptera (crickets, grasshoppers and katydids) from a diversity of Missouri natural areas including prairies, glades, woodlands and fens. A standardized sampling protocol was conducted at 30 sites and encompassed different management units within these sites. Adjacent tracts of the same natural community that had been subjected to different stewardship practices (for instance, haying and annual burning) were sampled separately and compared.'

Citation:
Ballard, H. E., and E. S. Greelee. 1996. Monitoring responses of orthopteran populations to fire management in Missouri Natural Areas: base-line data and initial analyses.