Document


Title

Public response to wildfire: is the Australian ''stay and defend or leave early'' approach an option for wildfire management in the United States?
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): S. M. McCaffrey; A. Rhodes
Publication Year: 2009

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Australia
  • education
  • evacuation
  • fire damage (property)
  • fire management
  • fire management
  • fire suppression
  • public information
  • public response
  • wildfire
  • wildfires
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 47461
Tall Timbers Record Number: 23404
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Journals-J
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

In the United States, the increasing costs and negative impacts of wildfires are causing fire managers and policymakers to reexamine traditional approaches to fire management including whether mass evacuation of populations threatened by wildfire is always the most appropriate option. This article examines the Australian ''stay and defend or leave early'' (SOLE) approach (which is not inherently the same as shelter in place) and the contextual factors that may make it more or less appropriate in the United States. We first discuss what SOLE actually entails and then examine four contextual areas that could influence how appropriate the approach might be in the United States: nature of fire risk, agency roles and responsibilities, education and shared responsibility, and human dimensions and decision-making. Although some contextual differences may mean that there are US locations where the approach would be inappropriate, they are not systematic enough to mean that the approach would not be viable in many localities. However, significant groundwork would need to be laid to ensure success. © 2009 by the Society of American Foresters. Abstract reproduced by permission.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
McCaffrey, S. M., and A. Rhodes. 2009. Public response to wildfire: is the Australian ''stay and defend or leave early'' approach an option for wildfire management in the United States? Journal of Forestry, v. 107, no. 1, p. 9-15.