Document


Title

Impacts of fire and fire surrogate treatments on ecosystem nitrogen storage patterns: similarities and differences between forests of eastern and western North America
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): R. E.J. Boerner; J. Huang; S. C. Hart
Publication Year: 2008

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Canada
  • carbon
  • coniferous forests
  • diameter classes
  • distribution
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • FFS - Fire and Fire Surrogate Study
  • fire frequency
  • fire hazard reduction
  • fire management
  • Florida
  • forest management
  • low intensity burns
  • mineral soils
  • national forests
  • Nevada
  • nitrogen
  • North Carolina
  • nutrient cycling
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • site treatments
  • snags
  • soil management
  • South Carolina
  • thinning
  • understory vegetation
  • Washington
  • wildfires
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 47408
Tall Timbers Record Number: 23339
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Journals-C
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

The Fire and Fire Surrogates (FFS) network is composed of 12 forest sites that span the continental United States, all of which historically had frequent low-severity fire. The goal of the FFS study was to assess the efficacy of three management treatments (prescribed fire, mechanical thinning, and their combination) in reducing wildfire hazard and increasing ecosystem sustainability. This paper describes the impact of the FFS treatments on nitrogen (N) storage and distribution. At the network scale, total ecosystem N averaged 4480 kg·ha-1, with ~9% in vegetation, ~9% in forest floor, ~2% in deadwood, and ~80% in soil. The loss of vegetation N to fire averaged (±SE) 25 ± 11 kg·ha-1, whereas the mechanical and combined mechanical and fire treatments resulted in N losses of 133 ± 21 and 145 ± 19 kg·ha-1, respectively. Western coniferous forests lost more N from each treatment than did eastern forests. None of the manipulative FFS treatments impacted >10%-15% of total N of these ecosystems. Management strategies that maximize ecosystem carbon (C) gain by minimizing loss of N should be a focus in western forests, where C and N cycling are tightly linked, but perhaps not in those eastern forests where atmospheric N deposition has decoupled C and N cycles. © 2008 Narional Research Council of Canada, NCR Research Press. Abstract reproduced by permission.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Boerner, R. E. J., J. Huang, and S. C. Hart. 2008. Impacts of fire and fire surrogate treatments on ecosystem nitrogen storage patterns: similarities and differences between forests of eastern and western North America. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, v. 38, no. 12, p. 3056-3070. 10.1139/X08-144.