Document


Title

Maintaining early-successional habitats using a metal wick herbicide applicator
Document Type: Conference Paper
Author(s): B. E. Warson ; W. E. Palmer ; P. T. Bromley ; J. R. Anderson
Editor(s): A. G. Eversole ; K. C. Wong ; D. Cobb ; R. W. Luebke ; R. Edwards ; S. Ball ; H. E. Namminga
Publication Year: 1998

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
Acer rubrum; aluminum; Carya; Carya glabra; cover; Diospyros virginiana; fire dependent species; forbs; forest management; grasses; ground cover; hardwoods; herbicides; legumes; Liquidambar styraciflua; mowing; pine; pine hardwood forests; Pinus taeda; population density; Quercus; Quercus falcata; Quercus marilandica; Quercus nigra; Quercus phellos; resprouting; seedlings; succession; vegetation surveys; wildlife; woody plants
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 47237
Tall Timbers Record Number: 23142
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Journals-S
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

We tested the efficacy of an aluminum wick herbicide applicator, the Weed Sweep®, for control of hardwood and pine saplings, 1994-1996. We compared spring and fall applications in trial and, in a second trial, tested 2 herbicide mixes: glyphosate mixed with either trichlopyr or imazapyr. Herbicides plots had 78% fewer sapling stems/ha than control plots (P < 0.006). May applications of glyphosate/imazapyr provided greater control of hardwoods but lower control of pines than September applications (P < 0.05). Also, glyphosate/imazapyr provided greater control of hardwoods than glyphosate/trichlopyr (P < 0.05). Percent ground cover by forbs, grass, and legumes and total number of species in the ground story did not differ between treatment and control plots. Our results indicate that a higher rate may be needed to achieve more consistent control of slower growing genera, such as Carya and Quercus. However, this technique may be valuable to managers needing an inexpensive alternative to mechanical methods for controlling hardwood resprouts and young pines and require a herbicide application technique more environmentally-sensitive than broadcast spraying. © by the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

Citation:
Warson, B. E., W. E. Palmer, P. T. Bromley, and J. R. Anderson. 1998. Maintaining early-successional habitats using a metal wick herbicide applicator, in Eversole, A. G., Wong, K. C., Cobb, D., Luebke, R. W., Edwards, R., Ball, S., and Namminga, H. E., Proceedings of the Fifty-second Annual Conference Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Orlando, FL. Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies,[Tallahassee, FL]. 52, p. 265-273,