Document


Title

Can we bring Madagascar's critically endangered palms back from the brink? Genetics, ecology and conservation of the critically endangered palm Beccariophoenix madagascariensis
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): A. Shapcott; M. Rakotoarinivo; R. J. Smith; G. Lysakova; M. F. Fay; J. Dransfield
Publication Year: 2007

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • conservation
  • fire management
  • fire management
  • flowering
  • forest management
  • fragmentation
  • fragmentation
  • frugivores
  • gene flow
  • genetics
  • inbreeding
  • Madagascar
  • palm
  • population density
  • rainforests
  • remote sensing
  • reproduction
  • seed dispersal
  • seeds
  • species recovery
  • sustainable harvesting
  • threatened and endangered species (plants)
  • tropical forests
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 46772
Tall Timbers Record Number: 22575
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Madagascar has a highly distinctive flora and is one of the world biodiversity hot spots. There are more than 170 species of palms, the majority of which are vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered endemics. Palms are utilized for many human uses, many of which lead to plant death or seed harvesting. Combined with reduced populations resulting from extensive forest clearing, those species which are harvested from the wild are under additional threat of extinction. Species recovery programmes have the potential to save some of the most iconic species before it is too late. This study documented the current known populations of the critically endangered palm Beccariophoenix madagascariensis, a species utilized for both local and international purposes. The study specifically investigated the genetic diversity and inbreeding within populations and the potential differentiation between populations and with the newly described species B. alfredii. We found that despite critically small population sizes there was considerable genetic diversity within populations. We also found that ecologically and or geographically distinct populations were genetically distinct. Populations within 3 km of each other exhibited considerable gene flow, probably owing to seed dispersal. The populations were inbred but reproductive viability had been maintained. Conservation and recovery options are discussed. © 2007 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society.

Citation:
Shapcott, A., M. Rakotoarinivo, R. J. Smith, G. Lysakova, M. F. Fay, and J. Dransfield. 2007. Can we bring Madagascar's critically endangered palms back from the brink? Genetics, ecology and conservation of the critically endangered palm Beccariophoenix madagascariensis. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, v. 154, no. 4, p. 589-608.