Document


Title

Using visible and near-infrared satellite imagery to monitor boreal forests
Document Type: Book Chapter
Author(s): F. J. Ahern; H. Epp; D. R. Cahoon; N. H.F. French; E. S. Kasischke; J. L. Michalek
Editor(s): E. S. Kasischke; B. J. Stocks
Publication Year: 2000

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • boreal forests
  • carbon
  • cover
  • fire intensity
  • fire management
  • fire scar analysis
  • forest management
  • New York
  • remote sensing
  • statistical analysis
  • wildfires
Topic(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: July 26, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 46185
Tall Timbers Record Number: 21859
TTRS Location Status: Not in file
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

From the Summary (p.328) ... 'In this chapter, we have discussed a number of methods to monitor the boreal forest by using satellite systems that collect data from the visible and infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although we have focused our attention on data collected by the Landsat and AVHRR systems, data from other satellite systems are available as well.Of particular note is the Earth Observing System that will be launched by the United States and several international partners in 1999. The MODIS will contain a total of 36 channels, 19 or which will be in the visible and infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Of particular importance are the seven bands or channels designed for direct observation of the earth's land surface. Although MODIS is designed to collect a global data set on a daily basis, its resolution is much better than AVHRR, with a 500-meter pixel spacing. This system should be particularly useful for monitoring the boreal forest.' © 2000 Springer-Verlag New York, Inc.

Citation:
Ahern, F. J., H. Epp, D. R. Cahoon, N. H. F. French, E. S. Kasischke, and J. L. Michalek. 2000. Using visible and near-infrared satellite imagery to monitor boreal forests, in ES Kasischke and BJ Stocks eds., Fire, climate change, and carbon cycling in the boreal forest. New York, Springer-Verlag, Ecological Studies; 138, p. 312-330.