Document


Title

The importance of traditional fire use and management practices for contemporary land managers in the American southwest
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): C. Raish; A. Gonzalez-Caban; C. J. Condie
Publication Year: 2005

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • aborigines
  • Arizona
  • CVM - contingent valuation method
  • education
  • fire hazard reduction
  • fire management
  • fuel management
  • human caused fires
  • indigenous-traditional attitudes toward fire
  • indigenous-traditional fire-use practices
  • land management
  • landscape ecology
  • Native Americans
  • New Mexico
  • public information
  • TEK - traditional ecological knowledge
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 14, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 45842
Tall Timbers Record Number: 21445
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Indigenous and traditional peoples worldwide have used fire to manipulate their environment for thousands of years. These long-standing practices still continue and have considerable relevance for today's land managers. This discussion explores the value of documenting and understanding historic and contemporary fire use attitudes and practices of the varied cultural/ethnic groups that interact with land managers concerning fire and fuels management in the American Southwest. Current research with historic records and present-day communities is reviewed. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Raish, C., A. Gonzalez-Caban, and C. J. Condie. 2005. The importance of traditional fire use and management practices for contemporary land managers in the American southwest. v. 6, no. 2, p. 115-122. 10.1016/j.hazards.2005.10.004. http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2005_raish_c001.pdf.