Document


Title

Acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities in soils from a jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) ecosystem after clear-cutting, prescribed burning, and scarification
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): W. J. Staddon; L. C. Duchesne; J. T. Trevors
Publication Year: 1998

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • acid phosphatase
  • alkaline phosphatase
  • arylsulfatase
  • Canada
  • clearcutting
  • duff
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • enzymes
  • fire intensity
  • fire intensity
  • fire management
  • forest management
  • fuel types
  • mineral soils
  • Ontario
  • pH
  • pine forests
  • Pinus banksiana
  • plant growth
  • post fire recovery
  • rate of spread
  • silviculture
  • site treatments
  • soil nutrients
  • soils
  • surface fuels
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 45185
Tall Timbers Record Number: 20657
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities were determined from organic and mineral soils of a jack pine (Pinus banksiana L.) community 4 years after clear-cutting alone, clear-cutting followed by prescribed burning and clear-cutting followed by scarification. Controls consisted of uncut plots. Prescribed burning lowered soil enzyme activities in the organic layers as compared to the other treatments. Acid phosphatase activity correlated with pH, log of fire intensity, consumption of total surface fuels and consumption of total fuels. Acid phosphatase was also inversely related to soil pH. The results suggest that acid phosphatase activity may be useful for assessing the impact of fire on soils. The use of soil enzymes to predict post-fire changes in soil quality and subsequent ecological phenomena is also discussed.

Citation:
Staddon, W. J., L. C. Duchesne, and J. T. Trevors. 1998. Acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities in soils from a jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) ecosystem after clear-cutting, prescribed burning, and scarification. Biology and Fertility of Soils, v. 27, no. 1, p. 1-4.