Document


Title

Use of the cover extension of Forest Vegetation Simulator and stocking guides to identify Northern Spotted Owl dispersal habitat in forest communities of central Oregon
Document Type: Conference Paper
Author(s): H. Maffei; M. Gerdes; S. Beyer; R. Sandquist
Compiler(s): R. Teck; M. Moeur; J. Adams
Publication Year: 1997

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Accipiter gentilis
  • Bubo virginianus
  • Cascades Range
  • community ecology
  • computer programs
  • coniferous forests
  • cover
  • Dendroctonus ponderosae
  • diameter classes
  • digital data collection
  • diseases
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • forage
  • forest management
  • habitat suitability
  • habitat types
  • insects
  • national forests
  • nesting
  • Oregon
  • overstory
  • Pinus ponderosa
  • plant communities
  • plant growth
  • population density
  • stand characteristics
  • statistical analysis
  • Strix
  • Strix occidentalis
  • threatened and endangered species (animals)
  • wildlife habitat management
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: August 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 44771
Tall Timbers Record Number: 20196
TTRS Location Status: Not in file
TTRS Call Number: A13.88:INT-373
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

The COVER extension of Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) is used in conjunction with stocking guides, forest inventory data, and field observations to develop a set of prodecures identifying specific central Oregon plant communities that have, as well as those that lack, the biological capability to grow sustainable northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) dispersal habitat. Results demonstrate that achievement of stable spotted owl dispersal habitat is heavily influenced by site potential. For example, ponderosa pine stands with site index values greater than 90 feet can be manged to provide stable, sustainable dispersal habitat; those with lower site index values cannot. Results of the analysis were used as a basis for a Deschutes National Forest policy on dispersal habitat. The policy applies to all projects on the Deschutes that implement the President's Forest Plan.

Citation:
Maffei, H., M. Gerdes, S. Beyer, and R. Sandquist. 1997. Use of the cover extension of Forest Vegetation Simulator and stocking guides to identify Northern Spotted Owl dispersal habitat in forest communities of central Oregon, in R Teck, M Moeur, and J Adams eds., Proceedings: Forest Vegetation Simulator Conference. Fort Collins, CO, USDA Forest Service Intermountain Research Station, Intermountain Research Station INT-GTR-373, p. 59-63.