Document


Title

Integrated pest management practices in southern pine nurseries
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): D. B. South; S. A. Enebak
Publication Year: 2006

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • BENEFIT-COST RATIOS
  • CLEANED EQUIPMENT
  • CONTROLLING NEMATODES
  • Cronartium fusiforme
  • Cronartium quercuum
  • CULLED SEEDLINGS
  • DAMPING OFF FUNGI
  • DENSE COVER-CROPS
  • fertilization
  • fire dependent species
  • forest management
  • fumigation
  • fungi
  • FUNIGICIDES
  • insects
  • insects
  • integrated pest management
  • invertebrates
  • loblolly pine
  • longleaf pine
  • microorganisms
  • Nematodes
  • nitrogen
  • NO WEEDY COMPOSTS
  • NURSERIES
  • pathogens
  • pest control
  • photosynthesis
  • Phyllophaga
  • physiology
  • pine forests
  • Pinus elliottii
  • Pinus palustris
  • Pinus taeda
  • plant diseases
  • plant growth
  • population density
  • SANITATION PRACTICES
  • SCREENED IRRIGATION WATER
  • seed germination
  • SEEDBED DENSITIES
  • seedlings
  • slash
  • slash pine
  • soil organisms
  • SOWING DATE
  • statistical analysis
  • weed control
  • WEED FREE COVER-CROPSEED
  • weed free mulches
  • weeds
Topic(s):
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 44040
Tall Timbers Record Number: 19338
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Integrated Pest Management is a system that combines cultural, biological and chemical technologies to reduce insect, fungal and weed populations to levels below those that result in economic damage. Nursery managers in the southern United States currently use many practices to control pests of southern pine seedlings. Over the last three decades, improvements in chemical, cultural, and biological pest control practices have increased seed efficiency (defined as the number of plantable seedlings produced divided by the number of pure live seed sown) and reduced the percentage of production costs associated with pest control. As crop values increase, the economic thresholds for applying control measures decrease. However, since the statstical power of most trials in bareroot nurseries is low, the likelihood of experiments that detect 'real' treatment difference (e.g. those that consistently increase seed efficiency to the point where economic returns are affected) will be low. This paper describes some current practices in southern pine nurseries and provides some economic injury levels for various pest control treatments. © Springer 2006.

Citation:
South, D. B., and S. A. Enebak. 2006. Integrated pest management practices in southern pine nurseries. New Forests, v. 31, no. 2, p. 253-271. 10.1007/s11056-005-6571-0.