Document


Title

Fire regimes in Nahanni National Park and the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary, Northwest Territories, Canada
Document Type: Conference Paper
Author(s): P. M. Bothwell; W. J. de Groot; D. E. Dube; T. Chowns; D. H. Carlsson; C. N. Stefner
Editor(s): R. T. Engstrom; K. E.M. Galley; W. J. de Groot
Publication Year: 2004

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Abies lasiocarpa
  • Betula
  • Betula papyrifera
  • Bison bison
  • bogs
  • boreal
  • boreal forests
  • Canada
  • coniferous forests
  • deciduous forests
  • distribution
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • elevation
  • fire danger rating
  • fire frequency
  • fire frequency
  • fire regime
  • fire regimes
  • fire scar analysis
  • fire size
  • fuel loading
  • histories
  • human caused fires
  • Larix laricina
  • lightning caused fires
  • mean fire return interval
  • mountains
  • national parks
  • Northwest Territories
  • Northwest Territories
  • Picea glauca
  • Picea mariana
  • Pinus banksiana
  • Pinus contorta
  • Populus balsamifera
  • Populus tremuloides
  • rate of spread
  • statistical analysis
  • taiga
  • topography
  • topography
  • wilderness areas
  • wildlife refuges
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 42442
Tall Timbers Record Number: 17517
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Tall Timbers shelf
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Nahanni National Park and the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary are ecologically important areas in the Northwest Territories. Fire history data in Nahanni National Park and the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary were used for a comparative analysis in order to identify the most influential characteristics of their respective fire regimes. The Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary is located on the Taiga Plains and is surrounded to the east and south by Great Slave Lake. Nahanni National Park is located in the Mackenzie Mountains, approximately 500 km west of the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary. Elevation relief in the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary is 160-260 m, and in Nahanni National Park is 180-2,640 m. Fuels are similar in both study areas and are dominated by low-density coniferous forest. Nahanni National Park has a significantly higher mean annual occurrence of very high and extreme classes of Canadian Fire Weather Index System codes and indices. Fire scar data indicate weighted mean fire return intervals (MFRIs) of 28 years and 27 years, respectively, for Nahanni National Park and the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary. Area burned totals from a national database of fires greater than 200 ha in area suggest a fire cycle of 1,142 years and 199 years, respectively, for Nahanni National Park and the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary. Differences in average fire size (1,149 ha in Nahanni National Park and 7,806 ha in the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary) are partially attributed to topographic differences between the two areas. © 2004, Tall Timbers Research, Inc.

Citation:
Bothwell, P. M., W. J. de Groot, D. E. Dube, T. Chowns, D. H. Carlsson, and C. N. Stefner. 2004. Fire regimes in Nahanni National Park and the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary, Northwest Territories, Canada, in Engstrom, R. T., Galley, K. E. M., and de Groot, W. J., Proceedings 22nd Tall Timbers Fire Ecology Conference: Fire in temperate, boreal, and montane ecosystems. Kananaskis Village, Alberta, Canada. Tall Timbers Research, Inc.,Edmonton, Alberta, Canada [Imperial Printing Ltd.]. p. 43-54,