Document


Title

Prediction of crown scorch in Pacific Northwest underburns
Document Type: Book
Author(s): G. M. McArthur
Publication Year: 1980

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Abies grandis
  • chaparral
  • combustion
  • crown scorch
  • crowns
  • duff
  • experimental fires
  • fire danger rating
  • fire injuries (plants)
  • fire intensity
  • fire management
  • fire size
  • flame length
  • foliage
  • fuel loading
  • fuel management
  • fuel moisture
  • fuel types
  • hardwood forests
  • heat effects
  • Ilex glabra
  • light burning
  • litter
  • mortality
  • overstory
  • partial cutting
  • pine forests
  • Pinus banksiana
  • Pinus clausa
  • Pinus contorta
  • Pinus palustris
  • Pinus resinosa
  • Pinus sylvestris
  • Pinus taeda
  • plant physiology
  • post fire recovery
  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • rate of spread
  • scorch
  • seed dormancy
  • Serenoa repens
  • slash
  • statistical analysis
  • temperature
  • Washington
  • wind
  • woody fuels
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: July 31, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 39213
Tall Timbers Record Number: 13851
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File - DDW
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

From the text: 'The primary objective of this study was to verify the existing relationship for crown scorch prediction, especially with respect to the P.N.W. species. This was to be achieved through secondary objectives: 1. To determine temperature tolerances of foliage of some common P.N.W. tree species, and 2. To develop scorch height data from experimental underburning over a range of conditions.'

Citation:
McArthur, G. M. 1980. Prediction of crown scorch in Pacific Northwest underburns. Seattle, WA, University of Washington.