Document


Title

A time for burning: traditional Indian uses of fire in the western Canadian boreal forest
Document Type: Whole Book
Author(s): H. T. Lewis
Publication Year: 1982

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • agriculture
  • Alberta
  • anthropology
  • backing fires
  • boreal forests
  • browse
  • Canada
  • cover
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • fire exclusion
  • fire frequency
  • fire management
  • flammability
  • forage
  • forest management
  • forest products
  • fuel types
  • game birds
  • grasslands
  • hardwood forests
  • human caused fires
  • hunting
  • livestock
  • mammals
  • marshes
  • Native Americans
  • pine forests
  • pioneer species
  • presettlement fires
  • season of fire
  • small mammals
  • succession
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 39072
Tall Timbers Record Number: 13699
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: CAN Docs DDW
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

From the text: 'With respect to traditional uses of fire, the Indians of northern Alberta exhibited a clear understanding of both what was happening as well as why things happened. They exhibited full understanding of systemic, relational effects of burning in their discussions of both the usefulness of burning and, in contrast, the environmental problems of contemporary practices of fire exclusion. In this respect, they are well aware of the highly variable ecological relationships both resulting from natural and man-made fires.'

Citation:
Lewis, H. T. 1982. A time for burning: traditional Indian uses of fire in the western Canadian boreal forest. Occasional Publication No. 17. Edmonton, Alberta, University of Alberta, Boreal Institute for Northern Studies.