Document


Title

Observations on savanna burning in the Olokemeji Forest Reserve, Nigeria
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): B. Hopkins
Publication Year: 1965

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Africa
  • biomass
  • cover
  • ecotones
  • experimental fires
  • fire control
  • fire intensity
  • fire management
  • grass fires
  • herbaceous vegetation
  • mortality
  • Nigeria
  • regeneration
  • savannas
  • statistical analysis
  • temperature
  • wilderness areas
  • wilderness fire management
Region(s):
  • International
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 38985
Tall Timbers Record Number: 13609
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

From the text ... 'The guinea savanna zone occupies about 40% of the area of Nigeria and derived savanna extends southwards from it into the forest zone. Much of the savanna occupies the area known as the Middle Belt-a thinly populated area which appears to have great possibilities for agricultural development. Almost all this savanna is burnt annually, so that a study of some fundamental aspects of savanna fires may be of considerable practical value. This paper describes some observations on the nature and effects of savanna burning in the Olokemeji Forest Reserve, which lies astride the boundary between the forest and the derived savanna zones. The physiognomy of the vegetation of the guinea zone and of the derived savanna zone is similar, but the dry season is longer and severer in the more northerly guinea zone. Hence, the results obtained at Olokemeji, while valid for the derived savanna zone, may not be fully applicable to the guinea zone proper. Most of the observations described hero were made on the research* plot of derived savanna woodland previously described (Hopkins 1962), or quite near to this on vary similar plots. In addition, some measurements of fire temperatures were made on the 'early burnt* and 'late burnt* plots of the fire-control experiment, about 3 km away from the 'research* plot described by Macgregor (1937) and Charter & Keay (1960).'

Citation:
Hopkins, B. 1965. Observations on savanna burning in the Olokemeji Forest Reserve, Nigeria. Journal of Applied Ecology, v. 2, p. 367-381.