Document


Title

Impacts of fire use on forest ecosystems
Document Type: Conference Paper
Author(s): G. L. Hayes
Publication Year: 1970

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Arizona
  • arthropods
  • broadcast burning
  • diseases
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • experimental fires
  • fire injuries (animals)
  • fire injuries (plants)
  • fire management
  • forest management
  • game birds
  • ground cover
  • hardwood forests
  • hydrology
  • insects
  • litter
  • livestock
  • Montana
  • New Mexico
  • nongame birds
  • pine forests
  • Pinus palustris
  • Pinus ponderosa
  • range management
  • seeds
  • slash
  • small mammals
  • soils
  • Washington
  • wildfires
  • wildlife
  • wildlife habitat management
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 38913
Tall Timbers Record Number: 13535
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: A13.32/2:R64 1970 and
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

From the text...'In closing I should emphasize that purposeful use of fire has not yet had much impact on western forest ecosystems. It is rapidly developing an impact on some ponderosa pine lands, however, notably some Indian lands managed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington and Arizona. It is quite apparent that fire has many additional potential uses in the multiple use management of forests. Its utility will depend in large measure in learning its impacts on ecosystems and learning how to use it to obtain desirable impacts while minimizing undesirable impacts.'

Citation:
Hayes, G. L. 1970. Impacts of fire use on forest ecosystems, The Role of Fire in the Intermountain West. Missoula, MT. University of Montana, School of Forestry,[Missoula, MT]. p. 99-118,