Document


Title

Relations between tree-ring widths, climate, and annual area burned in the boreal forest of Alberta
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): C. P.S. Larsen; G. M. Macdonald
Publication Year: 1995

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Alberta
  • boreal forests
  • Canada
  • coniferous forests
  • dendrochronology
  • fire frequency
  • forest management
  • national parks
  • Picea
  • Picea glauca
  • Pinus banksiana
  • precipitation
  • temperature
  • wildfires
  • wood
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 36649
Tall Timbers Record Number: 11047
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Journals-C
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Ring-width chronologies from three white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and two jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) sites in the boreal forest of northern Alberta were constructed to determine whether they could provide proxy records of monthly weather, summer fire weather, and the annual area burned by wildfires in Wood Buffalo National park. All but one of the standard and residual chronologies exhibited significant positive correlations with June precipitation in the growth year, and all but three of the chronologies exhibited positive correlations with precipitation in June, July or August of the previous year. Three of the residual chronologies also exhibited negative correlations with June temperature i the growth year. Four of the standard and residual chronologies exhibited significant correlatins with the Seasonal Severity Raing fire weather varible from Fort Smith, N.W.T. Four of the standard chronologies and three of the residual chronologies exhibited significant correlations with the annual area burned in Wood Buffalo National park. Significant correlations were also found for some of the standard and residual chronologies with fire weather and annual area burned in this portion of the boreal forest are sensitive to similar weather conditions. Tree-rin records may therefore provide a useful means of examining decadal to centennial length relations between climate and annual area burned in the boreal forest. © National Research Council of Canada. Abstract reproduced by permission.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Larsen, C. P. S., and G. M. Macdonald. 1995. Relations between tree-ring widths, climate, and annual area burned in the boreal forest of Alberta. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, v. 25, p. 1746-1755.