Document


Title

Ecological effects of forest fires
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Isabel F. Ahlgren; Clifford E. Ahlgren
Publication Year: 1960

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Acer
  • Betula papyrifera
  • birds
  • burning
  • burning effects
  • calcium
  • chemistry
  • cover
  • erosion
  • fire ecological effects
  • fish
  • forests
  • grasses
  • hardwood forest
  • heat
  • herbaceous vegetation
  • international
  • K - potassium
  • lichens
  • moisture
  • mosses
  • nitrogen
  • phosphorus
  • pine
  • pine hardwood forests
  • Pinus banksiana
  • Pinus strobus
  • plant diseases
  • plant growth
  • Populus
  • protection
  • reproduction
  • seed dispersal
  • shrubs
  • small mammals
  • soil
  • soil chemistry
  • soil flora
  • soil moisture
  • soil organic matter
  • soil organisms
  • soil temperature
  • sprouting
  • succession
  • temperature
  • Tilia americana
  • water
  • wildlife
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 3392
Tall Timbers Record Number: 1956
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

A review of literature, with chief reference to North America, but including also much literature from other parts of the world, under the main heads: effects of fire on soil (moisture relations, texture, temperature during and after burning, fertility, and chemical composition); and effects of fire on living organisms (lower plants, plant diseases and pests, bacteria, invertebrates, vertebrates, and plant succession).

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Ahlgren, Isabel F.; Ahlgren, Clifford E. 1960. Ecological effects of forest fires. The Botanical Review 26(4):483-533.