Document


Title

Foliar heat content variations in four coniferous tree species of central Alberta
Document Type: Journal
Author(s): Z. Chrosciewicz
Publication Year: 1986

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Abies balsamea
  • Abies spp.
  • age classes
  • Alberta
  • C - carbon
  • Canada
  • chemistry
  • CO2 - carbon dioxide
  • combustion
  • coniferous forests
  • crown fires
  • dominance (ecology)
  • foliage
  • forest management
  • fuel moisture
  • heat
  • hydrogen
  • laboratory fires
  • needles
  • oxygen
  • Picea
  • Picea glauca
  • Picea mariana
  • pine forests
  • Pinus banksiana
  • sampling
  • size classes
  • statistical analysis
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: September 20, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 33103
Tall Timbers Record Number: 7238
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Journals-C
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Foliar high heat contents were determined by standard oxygen bomb calorimetry in jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) from samples collected in central Alberta. New foliage, sampled in mid-July and early September, and foliage 1, 2, and 3 + years old, sampled in late May, mid-July, and early September, were included in these determinations. The heat contents of the new foliage in all four species as well as the heat contents of the old foliage in jack pine, black spruce, and balsam fir consistently increased with each sampling time, while the heat contents of the old foliage in white spruce at first increased and then decreased between the times. The variations of the heat contents attributed to foliar ages lacked consistency in all four species, although the contents of the new foliage were predominantly lower than the contents of the old foliage. The overall heat contents for the combined sampling times and foliar ages in both the new foliage and the old foliage were the lowest in white spruce and the highest in balsam fir, with black spruce having the second highest content in the new foliage and jack pine having the second highest content in the old foliage.© National Research Council of Canada, NRC Research Press. Abstract reproduced by permission.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Chrosciewicz, Z. 1986. Foliar heat content variations in four coniferous tree species of central Alberta. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, v. 16, no. 1, p. 152-157.