Document


Title

An analysis of the western redcedar-grand fir forest communities in the Selway-Bitteroot wilderness, with special emphasis on fuel accumulations and fire potential
Document Type: Book
Author(s): J. R. Habeck
Publication Year: 1973

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Abies grandis
  • climax vegetation
  • community ecology
  • coniferous forests
  • diameter classes
  • distribution
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • fire adaptations (plants)
  • fire dependent species
  • fire exclusion
  • fire frequency
  • fire injuries (plants)
  • fire intensity
  • forest management
  • fuel accumulation
  • fuel types
  • grasslands
  • ground fires
  • habitat types
  • invasive species
  • lightning caused fires
  • lightning effects
  • litter
  • mesic soils
  • mineral soils
  • moisture
  • mosaic
  • mountainous terrain
  • old growth forests
  • old growth vegetation
  • organic matter
  • overstory
  • pine forests
  • Pinus ponderosa
  • plant communities
  • plant growth
  • post fire recovery
  • precipitation
  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • reproduction
  • sampling
  • seedlings
  • sloping terrain
  • species diversity (plants)
  • succession
  • Thuja plicata
  • understory vegetation
  • wilderness areas
  • wildfires
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 29409
Tall Timbers Record Number: 3345
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Fire File
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

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Citation:
Habeck, J. R. 1973. An analysis of the western redcedar-grand fir forest communities in the Selway-Bitteroot wilderness, with special emphasis on fuel accumulations and fire potential. University of Montana-U.S. Forest Service.