Document


Title

Significance of extreme or intermittent conditions in distribution of species and management of natural resources, with a restatement of Liebig's law of minimum
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): W. P. Taylor
Publication Year: 1934

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • arthropods
  • biogeography
  • community ecology
  • distribution
  • disturbance
  • droughts
  • ecosystem dynamics
  • fire suppression
  • forest management
  • grazing
  • insects
  • land management
  • land use
  • moisture
  • nongame birds
  • population ecology
  • precipitation
  • range management
  • small mammals
  • temperature
  • wildlife habitat management
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 26811
Tall Timbers Record Number: 555
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: Journals-E
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

Liebig's Law of Minimum may be phrased as follows (see Chapman, ;31, p. 107): When a multiplicity of factors is present and only one is near the limits of toleration, this one factor will be the controlling one. The importance of extremes in environmental influences apparently necessitates the restatement of this 'law' in somewhat the following fashion: The growth and functioning of an organism is dependent upon the amount of the essential environmental factor presented to it in minimal quantity during the most critical season of the year, or during the most critical season of the year, or during the most critical year or years of a climatic cycle.© by the Ecological Society of America. Abstract reproduced by permission.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Taylor, W. P. 1934. Significance of extreme or intermittent conditions in distribution of species and management of natural resources, with a restatement of Liebig's law of minimum. Ecology, v. 15, no. 4, p. 374-379.