Document


Title

Burn severity: its impact on the natural, post-fire revegetation following the 1983 Rosie Creek fire near Fairbanks, Alaska
Document Type: Conference Proceedings
Author(s): M. Joan Foote
Publication Year: 1984

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • fire
  • revegetation vector
  • Rosie Creek Fire
  • seeding
  • Tanana Valley
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: December 3, 2015
FRAMES Record Number: 2153

Description

Burn severity directly impacts the quantity and quality of on-site plant revegetating vectors (seeds, spores, vegetative shoots and roots, etc.) that will survive the fire and be available for revegetation. Burn severity indirectly impacts the success of the invading or off-site plant vectors (seeds, spores, vegetative fragments, etc.) that establish on the burned surfaces by determining the nature of those surfaces. In general, the deeper or more severe the burn, the greater the loss of on-site revegetative vectors and the more dependence on off-site seeds, etc. And, the greater the amount of exposed mineral soil, the larger the number of successful seedling establishments. In order to predict the vegetative response an area will make after being burned one must know the following information: 1) the potentially available species (including those present in the burned area before the fire and those present in the adjacent areas after the fire), 2) the survival strategy or mode of revegetation (vegetative shoots, seeds, spores, etc) of each species and their special requirements (seed dormancy requirements, etc.), and 3) the post-fire location, condition, and quantity of each of the available vectors. The first two set the theoretical scene, the third determines reality. This paper provides the necessary information for predicting the revegetation response and then discusses the predicted and actual revegetation response following the 1983 Rosie Creek Fire. This fire impacted white spruce, aspen, paper birch, and black spruce forests in the Tanana Valley southwest of Fairbanks, Alaska. Burn severity in these areas ranged from very low to very high.

Citation:
Foote, M. Joan. 1984. Burn severity: its impact on the natural, post-fire revegetation following the 1983 Rosie Creek fire near Fairbanks, Alaska. 1984 Arctic Science Conference (35th Alaskan Science Conference); Oct 2, 1984. 238 p.