Document


Title

Evaluating the purpose, extent, and ecological restoration applications of indigenous burning practices in southwestern Washington
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Linda Storm; Daniela Joy Shebitz
Publication Year: 2006

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • Camas meadows
  • Camassia quamash
  • historical ecology
  • indigenous burning
  • prairie restoration
  • traditional ecological management
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: November 9, 2015
FRAMES Record Number: 17057

Description

Understanding the historic fire regime is essential before restoring fire to an ecosystem. Historical ecology provides a means to use both quantitative and qualitative data from different disciplines to address questions about how the traditional ecological management (TEM) practices of indigenous peoples influenced prairie and savanna ecosystems in the past. In this article, we evaluated paleoecological, archaeological, ethnographic, and ethnobotanical information about the Upper Chehalis River basin prairies of southwestern Washington to better understand the extent to which TEM influenced prairie distribution, composition, and availability of wild plant food resources. We also surveyed areas that had been burned at differing frequencies to test whether frequent fires increase camas (Camassia quamash) productivity. Preliminary results support the hypothesis that camas productivity increases with fire-return intervals of one to two years.

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Storm, Linda; Shebitz, Daniela Joy. 2006. Evaluating the purpose, extent, and ecological restoration applications of indigenous burning practices in southwestern Washington. Ecological Restoration 24(4):256-268.