Document


Title

Are we abusing our use of models and modelling in wildland fire and fuel management?
Document Type: Journal Article
Author(s): Martin E. Alexander
Publication Year: 2009

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
  • decision making
  • fire danger rating
  • fire intensity
  • fire management
  • flame length
  • fuel management
  • ignition
  • light
  • model limitations
  • rate of spread
  • wildfires
Partner Site(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: June 1, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 10965
Tall Timbers Record Number: 25552
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: A13.32:69/4
TTRS Abstract Status: Okay, Fair use, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

A whole host of computerized decision support systems and tools have emerged in recent years for use in wildland fire and fuel management (Peterson and others 2007). Few would argue with the notion that models and modeling are an integral component of modern day management practices (see figure). The question is, even with technical guidance (e.g., Stratton 2006), are we properly using such technology in light of the importance of the human element in the decision-making process?

Online Link(s):
Citation:
Alexander, M. E. 2009. Are we abusing our use of models and modelling in wildland fire and fuel management? Fire Management Today 69(4):23-26.