Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Year: 2014
Type: Document

From the Conclusions ... 'Fires have impacted cultures for millennia and fire will continue to impact contemporary cultures as well as the remnants of past cultures. The challenge is to manage vagetation/fuels to minimize damage to contemporary...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee, Ryan, Koerner
Year: 2012
Type: Document

Specimens of fossil gopher tortoises (Gopherus) were collected from five late Pliocene, two early Pleistocene, five middle Pleistocene, and 52 late Pleistocene sites in 18 counties in Florida, one county in Georgia, three in South Carolina, and one in...

Person: Franz, Quitmyer
Year: 2005
Type: Document

During the next few decades, a considerable portion of the productive boreal forest in Canada will be harvested and there is an excellent opportunity to use forest management activities (e.g., harvesting, regeneration, stand tending) to alter the...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Hirsch, Kafka, Todd
Year: 2004
Type: Document

Native food production in the Eastern Woodlands of North America before, and at the time of, European contact has been described by several writers as 'slash-and-burn agriculture,' 'shifting cultivation,' amd even 'swidden....

Person: Doolittle
Year: 2004
Type: Document

Forests in the Ozarks are ancient: the dominance and density of their various arboreal and herbaceous species have fluctuated over time in relation to climatic change and cultural influences. This study examines the nature of the pre-European forest...

Person: Spetich, Jutnry, Stahle
Year: 2004
Type: Document

From the text ... 'One of the first things that the English discovered about American Indians in Virginia was that they burned their wildlands. ...Four purposes for burning--agriculture, hunting, range management, and travel--would probably have...

Person: Brown
Year: 2000
Type: Document

Unlike many areas of the United States, anthropogenic fires are the prime agent for affecting changes in plant and animal species composition in the southern Appalachian Highlands. Although the extensive use of fire by the American Indians has been...

Person: Yaussy, Ison
Year: 2000
Type: Document

Fire suppression in the southern Appalachians is widely considered responsible for decreased regeneration in oak (Quercus) and fire-adapted species such as table mountain pine (Pinus rigida) and pitch pine (Pinus pungens) (Barden & Woods 1976;...

Person: Delcourt, Delcourt
Year: 1997
Type: Document

Managers of designated wilderness or conservation areas, especially those that are fire-dependent, often face a major dilemma. It is essential that fire perform its natural role of rejuvenating the ecosystem. Standards of environmental regulation,...

Person: Bryan, Reeves, Cole, Savery
Year: 1997
Type: Document