Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 46

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Warm summer temperatures and longer fire seasons are promoting larger, and in some cases, more fires that are severe in low- and mid-elevation, dry mixed-conifer forests of the Northern Rocky Mountains (NRM). Long-term historical fire conditions and...

Person: McWethy, Alt, Argiriadis, Battistel, Everett, Pederson
Year: 2020
Type: Document

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Year: 2020
Type: Document

An increasingly accepted paradigm in conservation attributes valued modern ecological conditions to past human activities. Disturbances, including prescribed fire, are therefore used by land managers to impede forest development in many potentially...

Person: Oswald, Foster, Shuman, Chilton, Doucette, Duranleau
Year: 2020
Type: Document

Aim: To evaluate the influence of climate and Aboriginal landscape management on Holocene vegetation and fire activity. Location: Flinders Island, Bass Strait, Tasmania where archaeological data document extended periods of human presence and absence...

Person: McWethy, Haberle, Hopf, Bowman
Year: 2017
Type: Document

Forest/steppe boundaries are among the most dynamic ecosystems on Earth and are highly vulnerable to changes in climate and land use. In this study we examine the postglacial history of the Patagonian forest/steppe ecotone (41-43°S) to better...

Person: Iglesias, Whitlock
Year: 2014
Type: Document

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Year: 2014
Type: Document

From the Conclusions ... 'Fires have impacted cultures for millennia and fire will continue to impact contemporary cultures as well as the remnants of past cultures. The challenge is to manage vagetation/fuels to minimize damage to contemporary...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee, Ryan, Koerner
Year: 2012
Type: Document

Summary1. Relationships between vegetation, climate and disturbance are likely to be altered in the near future as a result of changes in both climate and human impacts on ecosystems. These changes could trigger species losses and distribution shifts...

Person: Blarquez, Bremond, Carcaillet
Year: 2010
Type: Document

Specimens of fossil gopher tortoises (Gopherus) were collected from five late Pliocene, two early Pleistocene, five middle Pleistocene, and 52 late Pleistocene sites in 18 counties in Florida, one county in Georgia, three in South Carolina, and one in...

Person: Franz, Quitmyer
Year: 2005
Type: Document