Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Indigenous knowledge emphasises the importance of cultural connections between humans and the biophysical world. In the face of threats to the maintenance and transfer of Indigenous knowledge, novel approaches such as seasonal calendars are emerging as...

Person: McKemey, Ens, Hunter, Ridges, Costello, Reid
Year: 2021
Type: Document

The purpose of this special issue is to present the findings of a collaborative, interdisciplinary eco-archaeological project that is examining evidence for indigenous landscape management practices in central coastal California in Late Holocene and...

Person: Lightfoot, Lopez
Year: 2013
Type: Document

The Schultz Fire of 2010 burned just over 15,000 forested acres and caused the evacuation of hundreds of homes. Heavy floods followed the fire, resulting in extensive damage to property downstream from the charred hillsides. Nearly three years later,...

Person: Combrink, Cothran, Fox, Peterson, Snider
Year: 2013
Type: Document

This webinar will provide an introduction to the new edition of the Rainbow series that provides fire and land management professionals and policy makers with a greater understanding of the value of cultural resource protection and the methods...

Person: Ryan
Year: 2012
Type: Media

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Type: Document

Native Americans are often considered to have exploited available natural resources rather than modifying their environments to maximize yields. As simpler societies evolved into more complex ones, there is a consensus that intensification of habitat...

Person: Dey, Stambaugh, Clark, Schweitzer, Jurney
Year: 2012
Type: Document

The timing of the human control of fire is a hotly debated issue, with claims for regular fire use by early hominins in Africa at ~1.6 million y ago. These claims are not uncontested, but most archaeologists would agree that the colonization of areas...

Person: Roebroeks, Villa
Year: 2011
Type: Document

Fire is one of many ecological and cultural processes that affect cultural resources and the contexts in which they are located. Cultural resources are material and non-material representations of contemporary, historic, and prehistoric lifeways....

Person: Fowler
Year: 2004
Type: Document

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Person: Maclean
Year: 2003
Type: Document

From the text...'The term restoration relates to activities required to reduce hazards from wildland fires and improve federal forest and grassland health to a condition that can be maintained through periodic disturbance. Restoration and...

Person: Hardy, Keane, Harrington
Year: 1999
Type: Document