Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Type: Document

Fire was arguably the most important forest and rangeland disturbance process in the Inland Northwest United States for millennia. Prior to the Lewis and Clark expedition, fire regimes ranged from high severity with return intervals of one to five...

Person: Hessburg, Agee
Year: 2003
Type: Document

1. Two palaeoecological data sets were used to study forest development in the boreo-nemoral zone of southern Sweden during the last 3000 years. Maps of forest types present in 1250 B, AD 500 and today were compiled from regional pollen data and these...

Person: Lindbladh, Bradshaw, Holmqvist
Year: 2000
Type: Document

From the text...'The term restoration relates to activities required to reduce hazards from wildland fires and improve federal forest and grassland health to a condition that can be maintained through periodic disturbance. Restoration and...

Person: Hardy, Keane, Harrington
Year: 1999
Type: Document

Fire-maintained oak savannas on silt-loam soils essentially disappeared from midwestern North America soon after European settlement because of fire suppression and agriculture. As a result, there are no precise models for restoring this vegetation and...

Person: Bowles, McBride
Year: 1998
Type: Document

The myth persists that in 1492 the Americas were a sparsely populated wilderness, 'a world of barely perceptible human disturbance.' There is substantial evidence, however, that the Native American landscape of the early sixteenth century was...

Person: Denevan
Year: 1992
Type: Document