Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

The need for science to improve the application of prescribed fire has never been greater. Increasing complexity, be it from altered land use patterns, changing climate, or invasive species is challenging Rx fire managers ability to maintain, let alone...

Person: O'Brien
Year: 2021
Type: Media

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Year: 2020
Type: Document

An increasingly accepted paradigm in conservation attributes valued modern ecological conditions to past human activities. Disturbances, including prescribed fire, are therefore used by land managers to impede forest development in many potentially...

Person: Oswald, Foster, Shuman, Chilton, Doucette, Duranleau
Year: 2020
Type: Document

The importance of fire in many western ecosystems cannot be overstated. On the Kaibab National Forest, fire provides habitat for wildlife, maintains watersheds, and supports forest health and productivity. Fire also influences a wide range of values,...

Person: Weintraub, Gonzalez, MacDonald, Gatto, Lyndon, Banks, McLaughlin, Betenson, Hercher
Year: 2015
Type: Media

During the next few decades, a considerable portion of the productive boreal forest in Canada will be harvested and there is an excellent opportunity to use forest management activities (e.g., harvesting, regeneration, stand tending) to alter the...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Hirsch, Kafka, Todd
Year: 2004
Type: Document

Fire was arguably the most important forest and rangeland disturbance process in the Inland Northwest United States for millennia. Prior to the Lewis and Clark expedition, fire regimes ranged from high severity with return intervals of one to five...

Person: Hessburg, Agee
Year: 2003
Type: Document

Aim This study evaluates the long-term history of grassland, heathland and shrubland communities that are high priorities for conservation in the north-eastern US and support numerous globally rare species. Such an historical perspective is necessary...

Person: Motzkin, Foster
Year: 2002
Type: Document

From the text ... 'One of the first things that the English discovered about American Indians in Virginia was that they burned their wildlands. ...Four purposes for burning--agriculture, hunting, range management, and travel--would probably have...

Person: Brown
Year: 2000
Type: Document

1. Two palaeoecological data sets were used to study forest development in the boreo-nemoral zone of southern Sweden during the last 3000 years. Maps of forest types present in 1250 B, AD 500 and today were compiled from regional pollen data and these...

Person: Lindbladh, Bradshaw, Holmqvist
Year: 2000
Type: Document

Unlike many areas of the United States, anthropogenic fires are the prime agent for affecting changes in plant and animal species composition in the southern Appalachian Highlands. Although the extensive use of fire by the American Indians has been...

Person: Yaussy, Ison
Year: 2000
Type: Document