Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Numbers of animal species react to the natural phenomenon of fire, but only humans have learnt to control it and to make it at will. Natural fires caused overwhelmingly by lightning are highly evident on many landscapes. Birds such as hawks, and some...

Person: Gowlett
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Over the last three decades, archaeologists employed by federal land management agencies have become increasingly involved in wildland fire incidents. Roles and responsibilities are poorly identified for fire archaeologists, and guidance is limited to...

Person: Haines, Schofer
Year: 2008
Type: Document

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Person: Maclean
Year: 2003
Type: Document

Fire was arguably the most important forest and rangeland disturbance process in the Inland Northwest United States for millennia. Prior to the Lewis and Clark expedition, fire regimes ranged from high severity with return intervals of one to five...

Person: Hessburg, Agee
Year: 2003
Type: Document

Shallow soil cores from 56 localities along the crest of the Colorado Front Range were processed by water flotation and wet sieving, then examined for wood charcoal and charred conifer-needle fragments. Charred particles were largest and most numerous...

Person: Benedict
Year: 2002
Type: Document

Pollen, microscopic charcoal and peat humification analyses were applied to radiocarbon-dated peat cores to examine environmental change before and after the mid-Holocene transition from hunter-gatherer (Mesolithic) to agricultural (Neolithic)...

Person: Cayless, Tipping
Year: 2002
Type: Document

Managers of designated wilderness or conservation areas, especially those that are fire-dependent, often face a major dilemma. It is essential that fire perform its natural role of rejuvenating the ecosystem. Standards of environmental regulation,...

Person: Bryan, Reeves, Cole, Savery
Year: 1997
Type: Document

This report presents the Phase I results of a joint project between the Office of Archaeological Studies (OAS) of the Museum of New Mexico and the USDA Forest Service (USFS). The objectives of this study were to: 1) Determine whether cultural resources...

Person: Lentz, Gaunt, Willmer
Year: 1996
Type: Document

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Person: Fege, Corrigall
Year: 1990
Type: Document