Fire and Archaeology

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In this episode of Fire Ecology Chats, Fire Ecology editor Bob Keane talks with Megan Friggens and Rachel Loehman about results from their study that identified the environmental and climate variables that best predict observed fire severity and fire...

Person: Keane, Friggens, Loehman
Created Year: 2022
Type: Media

The need for science to improve the application of prescribed fire has never been greater. Increasing complexity, be it from altered land use patterns, changing climate, or invasive species is challenging Rx fire managers ability to maintain, let alone...

Person: O'Brien
Created Year: 2021
Type: Media

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Created Year: 2021
Type: Document

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Created Year: 2020
Type: Document

Ali Reiner and Carol Ewell presented a webinar on June 10, 2014. Fire behavior and effects models are frequently used to inform fire and land management decisions despite a lack of testing against field measurements. The Adaptive Management Services...

Person: Reiner, Ewell
Created Year: 2014
Type: Media

From the Conclusions ... 'Fires have impacted cultures for millennia and fire will continue to impact contemporary cultures as well as the remnants of past cultures. The challenge is to manage vagetation/fuels to minimize damage to contemporary...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee, Ryan, Koerner
Created Year: 2012
Type: Document

Fire was arguably the most important forest and rangeland disturbance process in the Inland Northwest United States for millennia. Prior to the Lewis and Clark expedition, fire regimes ranged from high severity with return intervals of one to five...

Person: Hessburg, Agee
Created Year: 2003
Type: Document

This report presents the Phase I results of a joint project between the Office of Archaeological Studies (OAS) of the Museum of New Mexico and the USDA Forest Service (USFS). The objectives of this study were to: 1) Determine whether cultural resources...

Person: Lentz, Gaunt, Willmer
Created Year: 1996
Type: Document

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Person: Nicholas, Patterson, Sassaman
Created Year: 1988
Type: Document

Numerous studies, historical accounts and archaeological evidence suggest that the historical density and abundance of black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.) in mixed conifer forests was much greater than today. Reasons for the decline of this species are...

Person: Pillsbury, Plumb, Kauffman, Martin
Created Year: 1987
Type: Document