Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 44

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Year: 2020
Type: Document

The Changbai Mountains forest ecosystem is one of the best-preserved temperate mountain forest ecosystems in Asia. Since the establishment of the reserve in 1960, extensive forest fires have been excluded as a result of strict regulation and...

Person: Meng, Jie, Li, Li, Liu, Gao, Wang, Niu, Liu, Zhang
Year: 2020
Type: Document

Fire use has played an important role in human evolution and subsequent dispersals across the globe, yet the relative importance of human activity and climate on fire regimes is controversial. This is particularly true for historical fire regimes of...

Person: Roos, Zedeño, Hollenback, Erlick
Year: 2018
Type: Document

The identification of fuel-related practices in archaeological contexts is almost always associated with the identification of fire-related structures. Charcoal analysis is the standard method of identifying wood use in the past; however, in many...

Person: Lancelotti, Ruiz-Pérez, García-Granero
Year: 2017
Type: Document

The southwest Jemez Mountains in central New Mexico have been utilized continuously for the past 2,000 years, and by circa 1300 CE a network of large village sites and fieldhouses created a significant human footprint on this fire-prone landscape....

Person: Loehman
Year: 2016
Type: Media

Interannual climate variations have been important drivers of wildfire occurrence in ponderosa pine forests across western North America for at least 400 years, but at finer scales of mountain ranges and landscapes human land uses sometimes over-rode...

Person: Swetnam, Farella, Roos, Liebmann, Falk, Allen
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Cultural resources are physical features, both natural and anthropogenic, associated with human activity. These unique and non-renewable resources include sites, structures, and objects possessing significance in history, architecture, archaeology, or...

Person: Loehman, Butler, Civitello, Constan, Dyer, Evans, Friggens, Kneifel, Reardon, Scheintaub, Steffen
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Ali Reiner and Carol Ewell presented a webinar on June 10, 2014. Fire behavior and effects models are frequently used to inform fire and land management decisions despite a lack of testing against field measurements. The Adaptive Management Services...

Person: Reiner, Ewell
Year: 2014
Type: Media

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Year: 2014
Type: Document