Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

In a changing world where the frequency of natural hazards is increasing, the consequences of disasters on cultural heritage assets are still not well understood. This can be attributed to shortcomings in existing risk management practices and to the...

Person: Figueiredo, Paupério, Romão
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Indigenous land use and climate have shaped fire regimes in southeast Australia during the Holocene, although their relative influence remains unclear. The archaeologically attested mid-Holocene decline in land-use intensity on the Furneaux Group...

Person: Adeleye, Haberle, Connor, Stevenson, Bowman
Year: 2021
Type: Document

The Changbai Mountains forest ecosystem is one of the best-preserved temperate mountain forest ecosystems in Asia. Since the establishment of the reserve in 1960, extensive forest fires have been excluded as a result of strict regulation and...

Person: Meng, Jie, Li, Li, Liu, Gao, Wang, Niu, Liu, Zhang
Year: 2020
Type: Document

The archaeology of fire is a developing field. One challenge centers on equifinality: distinguishing the affects of wildfire versus anthropogenic fire. Especially where evidence for control of fire by humans in the early Pleistocene remains debated,...

Person: Cutts, Hlubik, Campbell, Muschinski, Akuku, Braun, Patterson, O'Brien, Garrison, Harris
Year: 2019
Type: Document

We present a lake-sediment record of pre-Columbian agriculture and fire history from the lowlands of southern Pacific Costa Rica that captures the arrival of maize agriculture at ca. 3360 cal yr BP in the Diquís subregion of the Gran Chiriquí...

Person: Johanson, Horn, Lane
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Fire is a natural component of global biogeochemical cycles and closely related to changes in human land use. Whereas climate-fuel relationships seem to drive both global and subcontinental fire regimes, human-induced fires are prominent mainly on a...

Person: Dietze, Theuerkauf, Bloom, Brauer, Dörfler, Feeser, Feurdean, Gedminienė, Giesecke, Jahns, Karpińska-Kołaczek, Kołaczek, Lamentowicz, Latałowa, Marcisz, Obremska, Pędziszewska, Poska, Rehfeld, Stančikaitė, Stivrins, Święta-Musznicka, Szal, Vassiljev, Veski, Wacnik, Weisbrodt, Wiethold, Vannière, Słowiński
Year: 2018
Type: Document

To examine fire patterns and landscape evolution in the Xiangjiang River Basin over the past 1300 years, high-resolution charcoal and black carbon (BC, char and soot) records from the Tongguan Kiln archaeological site of historical ceramic production...

Person: Tan, Mao, Han, Mo, Gu, Liu, Long, An
Year: 2018
Type: Document

Native American populations declined between 1492 and 1900 CE, instigated by the European colonization of the Americas. However, the magnitude, tempo, and ecological effects of this depopulation remain the source of enduring debates. Recently, scholars...

Person: Liebmann, Farella, Roos, Stack, Martini, Swetnam
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Interannual climate variations have been important drivers of wildfire occurrence in ponderosa pine forests across western North America for at least 400 years, but at finer scales of mountain ranges and landscapes human land uses sometimes over-rode...

Person: Swetnam, Farella, Roos, Liebmann, Falk, Allen
Year: 2016
Type: Document