Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Santa Clara Indian Pueblo lands are adjacent to the Jemez National Forest, Bandelier National Monument and Valles Caldera National Preserve. This paper explores Pueblo vulnerability and resilience after repeated and devastating fires in this century as...

Person: Watson, Carver, Krenova, McBride, Stumpff
Year: 2015
Type: Document

Archaeological assemblages in the American Southwest are currently subjected to periodic wildfires and prescribed burns, and have been exposed to fires in the past. Ceramics are a key constituent of these assemblages, leading to questions regarding the...

Person: Kneifel
Year: 2015
Type: Document

The importance of fire in many western ecosystems cannot be overstated. On the Kaibab National Forest, fire provides habitat for wildlife, maintains watersheds, and supports forest health and productivity. Fire also influences a wide range of values,...

Person: Weintraub, Gonzalez, MacDonald, Gatto, Lyndon, Banks, McLaughlin, Betenson, Hercher
Year: 2015
Type: Media

Treelines are expected to rise to higher elevations with climate warming; the rate and extent however are still largely unknown. Here we present the first multi-proxy palaeoecological study from the treeline in the Northwestern Swiss Alps that covers...

Person: Schwörer, Kaltenrieder, Glur, Berlinger, Elbert, Frei, Gilli, Hafner, Anselmetti, Grosjean, Tinner
Year: 2015
Type: Document

Jason Nez, a Fire Archaeologist on the 2015 Rock Fire (Kaibab National Forest), will discuss how cultural resources can be protected during managed wildfires. The Kaibab National Forest has numerous cultural resources that are vulnerable to fire, but...

Person: Nez
Year: 2015
Type: Media