Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

Motivation: Rapid climate change is altering plant communities around the globe fundamentally. Despite progress in understanding how plants respond to these climate shifts, accumulating evidence suggests that disturbance could not only modify expected...

Person: Napier, Chipman
Year: 2022
Type: Document

Climatic conditions exert an important influence on wildfire activity in the western United States; however, Indigenous farming activity may have also shaped the local fire regimes for millennia. The Fish Lake Plateau is located on the Great Basin–...

Person: Carter, Brunelle, Power, DeRose, Bekker, Hart, Brewer, Spangler, Robinson, Abbott, Maezumi, Codding
Year: 2021
Type: Document

This webinar will provide an introduction to the new edition of the Rainbow series that provides fire and land management professionals and policy makers with a greater understanding of the value of cultural resource protection and the methods...

Person: Ryan
Year: 2012
Type: Media

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Type: Document

Aim There remains some uncertainty concerning the causes of extinctions of Madagascar's megafauna. One hypothesis is that they were caused by over-hunting by humans. A second hypothesis is that their extinction was caused by both environmental...

Person: Virah-Sawmy, Willis, Gillson
Year: 2010
Type: Document

Ethnographic literature documents the pervasiveness of plant-management strategies, such as prescribed burning and other kinds of cultivation, among Northwest Peoples after European contact. In contrast, definitive evidence of precontact plant...

Person: Lepofsky, Lertzman
Year: 2008
Type: Document

The inability to distinguish between human-caused and lightning ignitions in fire-history studies has led to three major problems: 1) a basic assumption that all pre-Euro-American settlement fire regimes are ''natural'' unless...

Person: Masters, Galley, Gassaway
Year: 2007
Type: Document

From the text ... 'We saw how fire suppression efforts often did more damage than the fire itself -- as we also questioned the high costs of aggressive fire suppression.... Wven some members of the wildland fire management community found it...

Person: Mills
Year: 2006
Type: Document

During the next few decades, a considerable portion of the productive boreal forest in Canada will be harvested and there is an excellent opportunity to use forest management activities (e.g., harvesting, regeneration, stand tending) to alter the...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Hirsch, Kafka, Todd
Year: 2004
Type: Document

Too often, wilderness conservation ignores a temporal perspective greater than the past 50 years, yet a long-term perspective (centuries to millennia) reveals the dynamic nature of many ecosystems. Analysis of fossil pollen, charcoal and stable...

Person: Gillson, Willis
Year: 2004
Type: Document