Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

This study describes a multivariate statistical model (derived using partial least squares regression, PLS-R) that derives charring intensity (reaction temperature and duration) from the attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared (...

Person: Constantine, Mooney, Hibbert, Marjo, Bird, Cohen, Forbes, McBeath, Rich, Stride
Year: 2021
Type: Document

In a changing world where the frequency of natural hazards is increasing, the consequences of disasters on cultural heritage assets are still not well understood. This can be attributed to shortcomings in existing risk management practices and to the...

Person: Figueiredo, Paupério, Romão
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Millenia of sustainable, low intensity land use have formed the cultural landscapes of central Europe. Studies from the Central Alps show that mountain pastures also look back onto many thousand years of land use history. In this palynological and...

Person: Gilck, Poschlod
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Year: 2021
Type: Document

The creation and modification of landscape patterns through interactions among people and the environment is a defining focus in the discipline of geography. Here, we contribute to that tradition by placing 500 years of red pine (Pinus resinosa) tree-...

Person: Larson, Kipfmueller, Johnson
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Climate change is allowing fire to expand into previously unburnt ecosystems and regions. While management policies such as fire suppression have significantly altered their frequency and intensity. To prevent future biodiversity/ecosystem services...

Person: Hawthorne, Colombaroli, Mitchell
Year: 2021
Type: Document

The intersection of expanding human development and wildland landscapes—the “wildland–urban interface” or WUI—is one of the most vexing contexts for fire management because it involves complex interacting systems of people and nature. Here, we document...

Person: Roos, Swetnam, Ferguson, Liebmann, Loehman, Welch, Margolis, Guiterman, Hockaday, Aiuvalasit, Battillo, Farella, Kiahtipes
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Climatic conditions exert an important influence on wildfire activity in the western United States; however, Indigenous farming activity may have also shaped the local fire regimes for millennia. The Fish Lake Plateau is located on the Great Basin–...

Person: Carter, Brunelle, Power, DeRose, Bekker, Hart, Brewer, Spangler, Robinson, Abbott, Maezumi, Codding
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Indigenous land use and climate have shaped fire regimes in southeast Australia during the Holocene, although their relative influence remains unclear. The archaeologically attested mid-Holocene decline in land-use intensity on the Furneaux Group...

Person: Adeleye, Haberle, Connor, Stevenson, Bowman
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Motivation: Rapid climate change is altering plant communities around the globe fundamentally. Despite progress in understanding how plants respond to these climate shifts, accumulating evidence suggests that disturbance could not only modify expected...

Person: Napier, Chipman
Year: 2021
Type: Document