Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Archaeology is a major resource issue when there is a fire, whether it is a Wildfire, Wildland Fire Use or a prescribed burn. During fires, the Kaibab National Forest often requests archaeologists from other forests and regions to assist with fires on...

Person: Hangan, Lyndon, Reid, Weintraub, Bettenson, Ruff, Gifford, Haines, Robertson
Year: 2008
Type: Document

It is unclear to what extent Native Americans in the pre-European forests of northeast North America used fire to manipulate their landscape. Conflicting historical and archaeological evidence has led authors to differing conclusions regarding the...

Person: Bean, Sanderson
Year: 2008
Type: Document

Over the last three decades, archaeologists employed by federal land management agencies have become increasingly involved in wildland fire incidents. Roles and responsibilities are poorly identified for fire archaeologists, and guidance is limited to...

Person: Haines, Schofer
Year: 2008
Type: Document

This paper interprets macroscopic charcoal (>250 μm), humification and loss-on-ignition over the last ~14200 cal. BP from Goochs Swamp, located to the west of Sydney in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. This study aimed to investigate...

Person: Black, Mooney, Attenbrow
Year: 2008
Type: Document

Ethnographic literature documents the pervasiveness of plant-management strategies, such as prescribed burning and other kinds of cultivation, among Northwest Peoples after European contact. In contrast, definitive evidence of precontact plant...

Person: Lepofsky, Lertzman
Year: 2008
Type: Document