Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

In California, the percentage of wildland which is prescribed burned has been declining for many years. Fear of litigation, environmental concerns, and public perceptions seem to be the stumbling blocks. Is the reverse true: if we stop prescription...

Person: Bryan, Bakken
Year: 1997
Type: Document

We evaluated the importance of pre-Columbian human impacts on vegetation of the southern Appalachian highlands by comparing the fossil pollen and charcoal-particle record preserved in peat deposited during the past 3900 calendar years in Horse Cove Bog...

Person: Delcourt, Delcourt
Year: 1997
Type: Document

Fire suppression in the southern Appalachians is widely considered responsible for decreased regeneration in oak (Quercus) and fire-adapted species such as table mountain pine (Pinus rigida) and pitch pine (Pinus pungens) (Barden & Woods 1976;...

Person: Delcourt, Delcourt
Year: 1997
Type: Document

Cultural Resources (more recently named Heritage Resources) are becoming recognized resources which require the same planning, inventory, mitigation and management activities as other more familiar natural resources. Management of prescribed fire and...

Person: Bryan, Knudsen
Year: 1997
Type: Document

The rejuvenating effects of natural fires prior to 1900 in Southwestern forest communities have been replaced by recent, unprecedented crownfires. These wildfires have given rise to planned expansion of management fire as a tool for ecosystem...

Person: Bryan, Lissoway
Year: 1997
Type: Document

Managers of designated wilderness or conservation areas, especially those that are fire-dependent, often face a major dilemma. It is essential that fire perform its natural role of rejuvenating the ecosystem. Standards of environmental regulation,...

Person: Bryan, Reeves, Cole, Savery
Year: 1997
Type: Document

From the text... "This paper examines the pressures that lead to reduction of biodiversity especially the threat of wildfire to environmental resources, how indigenous people in Ghana protect vital environmental resources through culture, religion...

Person: Greenlee, Nsiah-Gyabaah
Year: 1997
Type: Document