Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 39

Motivation: Rapid climate change is altering plant communities around the globe fundamentally. Despite progress in understanding how plants respond to these climate shifts, accumulating evidence suggests that disturbance could not only modify expected...

Person: Napier, Chipman
Year: 2022
Type: Document

In a changing world where the frequency of natural hazards is increasing, the consequences of disasters on cultural heritage assets are still not well understood. This can be attributed to shortcomings in existing risk management practices and to the...

Person: Figueiredo, Paupério, Romão
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Charcoal analysis, applied in sediment facies analysis of the Pecora river palaeochannel (Tyrrhenian southern Tuscany, Italy), detected the occurrence of past fire events in two different fluvial landforms at 800–450 BC and again at AD 650–1300. Taking...

Person: Buonincontri, Pieruccini, Susini, Lubritto, Ricci, Rey, Tinner, Colombaroli, Drescher-Schneider, Dallai, Marasco, Poggi, Bianchi, Hodges, Di Pasquale
Year: 2020
Type: Document

The lack of scientific information about the effects of wildfire on prehistoric structures and rock art, such as dolmens and petroglyphs, impedes the development of conservation guidelines. In this study, the impact of a recent wildfire (late 2017) on...

Person: Pozo-Antonio, Sanmartín, Serrano, de la Rosa, Miller, Sanjurjo-Sánchez
Year: 2020
Type: Document

In Australia, the drivers of precolonial fire regimes remain contentious, with some advocating an anthropogenic-dominated regime, and others highlighting the importance of climate, climatic variability or alternatively some nexus between climate and...

Person: Mooney, Hope, Horne, Kamminga, Williams
Year: 2020
Type: Document

Mountain tropical forests of the Southern Maya Area (Pacific Chiapas and Guatemala, El Salvador, and Northern Honduras) predominantly comprise pine and oak formations, which form intricate mosaics and complex successional interactions following large–...

Person: Harvey, Nogué, Stansell, Petrokofsky, Steinman, Willis
Year: 2019
Type: Document

In the Orinoco Llanos, archaeological studies indicate a continuous late Holocene human occupation, including the development of ranked societies, from about 1,500 year bp (ad 500) However, until now palaeoecological studies dealing with the impact of...

Person: Leal, Gassón, Behling, Sánchez
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Questions: We investigated the changing role of climate, forest fires and human population size in the broad‐scale compositional changes in Holocene vegetation dynamics before and after the onset of farming in Sweden (at 6,000 cal yr BP) and in Finland...

Person: Kuosmanen, Marquer, Tallavaara, Molinari, Zhang, Alenius, Edinborough, Pesonen, Reitalu, Renssen, Trondman, Seppa
Year: 2018
Type: Document

Climatic change that occurred during the Holocene is often recognized as the main factor for explaining fire dynamics, while the influence of human societies is less apparent. In eastern North America, human influence on fire regime before European...

Person: Blarquez, Talbot, Paillard, Lapointe-Elmrabti, Pelletier, St-Pierre
Year: 2018
Type: Document

Fire is a natural component of global biogeochemical cycles and closely related to changes in human land use. Whereas climate-fuel relationships seem to drive both global and subcontinental fire regimes, human-induced fires are prominent mainly on a...

Person: Dietze, Theuerkauf, Bloom, Brauer, Dörfler, Feeser, Feurdean, Gedminienė, Giesecke, Jahns, Karpińska-Kołaczek, Kołaczek, Lamentowicz, Latałowa, Marcisz, Obremska, Pędziszewska, Poska, Rehfeld, Stančikaitė, Stivrins, Święta-Musznicka, Szal, Vassiljev, Veski, Wacnik, Weisbrodt, Wiethold, Vannière, Słowiński
Year: 2018
Type: Document