Fire and Archaeology

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In this episode of Fire Ecology Chats, Fire Ecology editor Bob Keane talks with Megan Friggens and Rachel Loehman about results from their study that identified the environmental and climate variables that best predict observed fire severity and fire...

Person: Keane, Friggens, Loehman
Year: 2022
Type: Media

Background: Wildfires of uncharacteristic severity, a consequence of climate changes and accumulated fuels, can cause amplified or novel impacts to archaeological resources. The archaeological record includes physical features associated with human...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Constan, Kneifel
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Type: Document

The southwest Jemez Mountains in central New Mexico have been utilized continuously for the past 2,000 years, and by circa 1300 CE a network of large village sites and fieldhouses created a significant human footprint on this fire-prone landscape....

Person: Loehman
Year: 2016
Type: Media

Cultural resources are physical features, both natural and anthropogenic, associated with human activity. These unique and non-renewable resources include sites, structures, and objects possessing significance in history, architecture, archaeology, or...

Person: Loehman, Butler, Civitello, Constan, Dyer, Evans, Friggens, Kneifel, Reardon, Scheintaub, Steffen
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Ali Reiner and Carol Ewell presented a webinar on June 10, 2014. Fire behavior and effects models are frequently used to inform fire and land management decisions despite a lack of testing against field measurements. The Adaptive Management Services...

Person: Reiner, Ewell
Year: 2014
Type: Media

From Wildland Fire Management Recommendations ... 'The protection of cultural resources during wildland fire is more challenging than for a prescribed burn. Treatment options available to mitigate the direct impacts from wildland fire include use...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee, Timmons, DeBano, Ryan
Year: 2012
Type: Document

During the next few decades, a considerable portion of the productive boreal forest in Canada will be harvested and there is an excellent opportunity to use forest management activities (e.g., harvesting, regeneration, stand tending) to alter the...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Hirsch, Kafka, Todd
Year: 2004
Type: Document

The methods and motivations for fire use varied for late prehistoric societies of the Southwest. Although fire was probably used to increase the returns from hunting and gathering on marginal lands, it seems doubtful that comprehensive burning was used...

Person: Ffolliott, DeBano, Baker, Gottfried, Solis-Garza, Edminster, Neary, Allen, Hamre, Fish
Year: 1996
Type: Document

This report presents the Phase I results of a joint project between the Office of Archaeological Studies (OAS) of the Museum of New Mexico and the USDA Forest Service (USFS). The objectives of this study were to: 1) Determine whether cultural resources...

Person: Lentz, Gaunt, Willmer
Year: 1996
Type: Document